Monday, November 26, 2012

Monday, August 06, 2012

Looking to Adopt a Baby? Learn About These Domestic Adoption Opportunities

Nationwide domestic adoption center Lifetime Adoption is currently seeking adoptive families for the following babies and children:

We are in need of an adoptive family to adopt a sibling group of a six-year-old boy and his four-year-old sister. Both children are of mixed Puerto Rican, Hawaiian, and African American ethnicity. Their birth mother feels that they would be most blessed with an adoptive family that will plan fun activities for her children. She would like to eventually have an open adoption after the children have adjusted and bonded with the adoptive family.

Another birthmother is due in October and is expecting a full African American baby.  She's hoping to place with a married Christian adoptive couple who promise to provide her child with lots of love and stability. She is open to placing with a couple of any race. She hasn't used any drugs or alcohol during her pregnancy, and states only minimal cigarette smoking.

Thirdly, we’re seeking a seeking a couple to adopt a baby girl who is due in November. She will be of mixed Hispanic, Caucasian, and African American ethnicity. The birth mother is looking for a couple who has been married several years, adopted before and is open to helping with pregnancy-related medical expenses. She would like to visit yearly.

The first step to introduce you to birthmothers like these ones is to complete your FREE online application to adopt. If you’d like action steps towards adopting, complete the online application or call 530-432-7373 for more info.

Saturday, July 14, 2012

6 Tips to Successful Adoption Communication...part 2

Availability and communication are key when you're waiting to adopt. If you don't answer a call or keep in touch with the people involved in your adoption you could risk your opportunity to build the family you've longed for.

As we read in yesterday's post, it's important to be aware of modern communication's affect on your adoption success. With a few basic reminders, you'll be prepared to stay in tune through each phase of your adoption journey.

Here are the remaining tips to help you prepare for a positive experience with as little confusion or misunderstanding as possible.


4. Respect confidentiality: Keep details about your birthmother and aspects about your adoption match private as your adoption unfolds. Do not include your birth mother in mass emails sent to other friends or contacts. Protect her privacy and don’t disclose personal information about your adoption in chat boards, Facebook, email, or any place online where you could compromise confidentiality or your adoption future. 

5. Learn to use privacy settings: You’ll have freedom to explore a relationship with your birthmother or adoption professional more if you understand the settings your phone, email, and Facebook profile offer. Protect your privacy without appearing closed-off and impersonal. Set up your own 800# to direct to your cell phone, until you feel comfortable sharing your direct number. Arrange for your email to show only your first names as the contact. When it comes to open adoption, modern communication allows great potential for your on-going relationship, and if you're aware of how to manage settings you'll be able to allow growth and trust to develop without feeling like you're putting your privacy on the back-burner.

6. Behave yourself: As with any communication, good manners go a long way. Even if you disagree with your birthmother or adoption professional, or are confused or disappointed, stay calm and don’t respond in anger. Avoid sarcasm, crude humor or bad language. Remember that emails and texts can be forwarded to others and may be confused in translation. Ask questions when you are unsure, before you react in a way that fuels a terrible misunderstanding. Be clear and polite in all communication.

When in doubt ASK. People feel validated and understood when you ask them to clarify their expectations and needs from you, especially when it comes to how to best stay in touch. Plus, when you ask what they expect it gives you opportunity to express your own needs and requests. With a little common sense, basic old-fashioned etiquette and thoughtfulness, and priority given to your adoption you will reduce stress and eliminate potential disappointment. 

Friday, July 13, 2012

6 Tips to Successful Adoption Communication...part 1


As quickly as technology changes communication, it’s getting difficult to know what is proper and polite when it comes to cell phones, emails, and text messaging. For adopting parents, the boundaries and etiquette for phone calls, texts, and emails may be confusing at times.

While availability and priority are key, here are some ways you won’t feel like you’re crossing a line into socially-oblivious.


1. Set priorities: If you were talking with a birth mother, attorney, or your adoption coordinator in person you wouldn’t be seen taking other calls or texts while you met together. Respect a phone call or text message in the same way, giving your adoption full attention. It helps to take notes during the conversation to that you stay attentive to the details of your time together, and also have reference later to things discussed. Be present in each interaction regarding your adoption.

2. Prepare others and ask for grace: Let your loved ones, coworkers and employer, and possibly even your church know you’re waiting to adopt and may need to take an unexpected call, at any moment. If your office or church have a no-cell-phone policy, ask for special arrangements so that you can keep your phone on vibrate so as not to miss a call from your adoption professionals, or your birth mother. 

3. Understand expectations: When text messaging reply as soon as possible, but realize a phone call warrants a more immediate response, and is more appropriate for urgent or important questions or responses. If your birthmother or adoption professional leaves a voice mail, return it promptly. Return emails as soon as possible, preferably within 24 hours. An unreturned phone call or unanswered text or email message leaves a lot of time for the plan to change, so stay in the loop and be as available as possible.

If needed, ask your birth mother or adoption professional how soon they need to hear back from you when they reach out, and find out their preferred method of communication so that you can best meet their expectations to stay connected.

Stay tuned for Adoption Communication Tips 4-6 tomorrow!

Tuesday, July 03, 2012

Independence Day Freebie!


*Limit one book per order. Book and bracelet shipped to same address. Purchase online anytime, or by phone Monday-Friday, closed 7/4: call (530) 432-7383 or visit MyAdoptionPrayer.com.
Offer expires July 13, 2012. Shipping not included in price of bracelet.
All proceeds from Adoption Prayer Bracelets go to the Lifetime Adoption Foundation.
Orders processed through American Carriage House Publishing.

Monday, June 25, 2012

Your words make a difference


How often do you catch yourself saying "if" when it comes to your hopes for a child? Do you hear phrases like "If I adopt..." or "If we become parents..." or "if a birth mother chooses us..."? "IF" can creep into your wording and start to wear down your confidence that your dreams of growing your family WILL come true.

Two letters spell a tiny word that can harvest big doubt. If you're caught in the "if" limbo, try purposely changing “ifs” to “WHEN.”  "WHEN" is a word that reflects faith you're moving in the right direction. "WHEN I adopt...", "WHEN our child's birth mother speaks with us...", "WHEN we bring our baby home..." are statements covered in the confidence that you're moving forward to realize your dream.

This summer, change your “ifs” to “when” as you move closer to your dream of parenthood. Make this the season your future family is no longer an "if" but a matter of "when."

SIGN UP TO ATTEND
LIVE Adoption Webinar on June 25th
at 5pm Pacific Time
One way to transition your "ifs" to "when" is to get answers to your adoption questions as you research your options. Join us TONIGHT for a chance to learn more about your family’s possibilities through adoption. Lifetime’s Adoption Q&A Webinar is a chance to ask questions and get the tips and details for a successful future in adoption.

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Protestant Christian Adoptive Families Needed to Adopt

Lifetime Adoption is currently seeking adoptive families for the following babies and children:

We are in need of an adoptive parents for an African American baby boy due in September. His birthmother feels that he'd be best with a married couple who are devout Christians. She is open to placing with a couple of any race, and is also open to placing with a couple who already have children. A middle class couple who both work would be ideal. She states no drug, cigarette, or alcohol usage during her pregnancy.

Another birthmother is due in October and is expecting a Caucasian baby. The baby's birthmother is interested in placing with a Caucasian married couple. A couple living in or near Oklahoma would be ideal. During this pregnancy, she states no drug, cigarette, or alcohol usage.

Thirdly, we’re seeking a seeking a couple to adopt a two year old Caucasian girl. The girl's birthmother feels that her daughter would be best with a Caucasian married couple who are Protestants. She is open to placing with a couple who already have children. Her daughter is healthy and on-track developmentally. After placement, she'd like to receive updates on her daughter via emails and letters, and have visits once or twice a year.

The first step to introduce you to birthmothers like these ones is to complete your FREE online application to adopt. If you'd like action steps towards adopting, complete the online application or call 530-432-7373 for more info.